Follow the path you love.

I found this great article today, shared by AIGA Jacksonville (https://www.facebook.com/AIGAJacksonville).  What caught my eye is something that keeps coming up in design:  it’s not about knowing the tools, but how you use them.  One of the most difficult things as an emerging/student designer to learn is that dreaded “learning curve” of “I want to do everything and right now!”…but find out you need more time practicing the tools.  As you know, I’m an advocate of the practice, practice, practice concept, and there’s a reason for that…the more comfortable you become with the tools when you’re a student, the easier the transition to doing what YOU want in design will be.

Andrew Clarke, author of the article, states:

Perhaps the most important lessons I learned at art school were not to take what we hear or see at face value and to question everything we’re told. Everyone should do that. I want you to always ask, “Can I do it better?” Remember that just because something’s been done doesn’t mean you can’t do it better. There’s really nothing we can’t improve, and we don’t have to improve it for everyone — improving it for ourselves is often more important.

It’s not enough to merely regurgitate designs…we must look, see and observe what’s going on around us.  Why do we like certain designs?  What are we interested in as a designer?  These are things only time and exploration will unfold.

How do we find ourselves  in art and design?  How do we find inspiration?  All of us will take our own path, for sure, but know that as long as you try your hardest, push yourself harder, you will succeed.

 

More links on inspiration/how to make it as a designer:

Work Hard and Be Nice to People

Be Humble, Be Honest and Don’t Be Afraid to Fail

Advice for Students and Young Web Designers

In this article, experts on a panel give advice to young/emerging designers.  One of my favorite parts?

WOLFGANG BARTELME
Well, I guess the most important thing is “practice, practice, practice.” To improve the quality of your work, you have to keep pushing yourself further and further.

 

Ira Glass on Creativity

I showed this in some of the classes as an example for kinetic typography…but the message itself is important to hear.

Image

 

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